Thursday, 24 April 2014

Bern Hyperlapsed

Bern Hyperlapsed is a short portrait of the Old City of Bern. It merges a view on traditional sights with the novel visual impression allowed by hyperlapse photography. The film consists of around 3500 single pictures, mainly taken between December 2013 and March 2014.



Vimeo link

(thanks Cora)

The World's Longest Conveyor Belt Is 61 Miles Long

image credit: jbdodane

Western Sahara, a territory currently ruled by Morocco, looks like a desolate place. There's little vegetation, but there are substantial phosphate resources. Bou Craa, a mining town in the interior, extracts phosphate ore and ships it to the coast.

Rather than trucking the ore to the coast, the mining company found an inventive way to convey the ore a great distance. It built a conveyor belt to do the job. It caries the ore 61 miles (98 kilometers) across the desert to the port of El-Aaiun. This conveyor belt is the longest in the world.

What's In A Name?


Ever wondered where your name comes from? Ever wondered where it's going?
WhitePages Names indulges your curiosity. From the common to the rare, Whitepages Names can help you find the information you want, and maybe even have some fun.

For example, do you live in the US and is your name John? Then you're not the only one. There are 5,189,434 people in the U.S who have this name. Massachusetts has the most people named John per capita and the year 1914 marked the height of its popularity. For girls, Mary is the most popular name. There are 3,401,599 Mary's in the US. Most of them live in Mississippi.

The Beheaded Statues Of Nemrut Dagi in Turkey

image credit: Mario Columba

Nemrut Dagi is a mountain in southeastern Turkey, notable for the summit where a number of large statues are erected around what is assumed to be a royal tomb.

Decapitated statues are sitting with their heads on the ground watching around south-eastern Turkey on top of one of the highest peaks of the Eastern Taurus mountain range. The archaeological site Nemrut Dagi is a time machine on top of a mountain that'll take you back to 62 BC.

How Technology Affects Sleep


This infographic explores the relationship between modern technology and sleep disturbances. So if you're addicted to watching television before bed, or frequently get rudely awoken by your mobile in the middle of the night, find out how these factors can influence your sleep, and what you can do to achieve a better night's sleep.

Daily Cartoon

Dan Rosandich is an American cartoonist. Dan's cartoons have appeared in the Saturday Evening Post, National Review, The National Enquirer, Science Digest, Reader's Digest and Woman's World. The Presurfer, in cooperation with Dan Rosandich, will bring you a cartoon every day.

The Price Tag On Queen Elsa's Ice Palace


Since Frozen was just named as the highest-grossing animated film of all time, Movoto felt it was appropriate to see exactly what Elsa's ice palace would be worth in the real world.

Sure, it might be chilly up in the mountains, but who wouldn't want to play ice queen over their very own Frozen castle?

(thanks Chad)

Wednesday, 23 April 2014

Bat.Tutty.Ry

A robot needs to recharge his battery before it drains. Unfortunately, his choice of power source is not very happy with him.



Vimeo link

(thanks Cora)

The Kannesteinen Rock

image credit: Sogn og Fjordane fylkeskommune

Shaped over thousands of years by the crashing waves, the Kannesteinen Rock is a magnificent mushroom shaped rock formation located in the rural village of Oppedal, Norway.

While difficult to measure the exact size by looking at the photographs, the rock is about three feet high and wide enough for three or four people to stand on.

What About The Pickled Peppers?


(via Bad Newspaper)

The Victorian Inventor Of The Wheelie

image credit Library of Congress)

A hundred years before the rise of extreme sports, stunt bikers took big risks and drew bigger crowds. Although he's largely forgotten today, Daniel J. Canary was one of the best.

In 1897, one of the top stunt bicyclists in the United States called Canary 'the father of us all.' Canary performed amazing feats on the high-wheel, but when he got his hands on the newly-invented 'safety bicycle,' the father of the bikes we know today, he did even more: he invented the wheelie.

(via Nag on the Lake)

Students Solve Old Problem With New Ketchup Cap

High school seniors Tyler Richards and Jonathan Thompson have spent a lot of time thinking about ketchup. As students in the Project Lead the Way program at North Liberty High School, Richards and Thompson have researched and developed a bottle cap that prevents that first squirt of ketchup from being a watery mess.



YouTube link

Daily Cartoon

Dan Rosandich is an American cartoonist. Dan's cartoons have appeared in the Saturday Evening Post, National Review, The National Enquirer, Science Digest, Reader's Digest and Woman's World. The Presurfer, in cooperation with Dan Rosandich, will bring you a cartoon every day.

Got Drunk, Fell Down: Lampposts Behaving Badly

image credit: Paul B

It is behavior seen throughout the world on a Saturday night - in fact on every night of the week which happens to have an a in it. There are always a few who have just that little bit too much and end up making a scene, a spectacle and often a mess in to the bargain.

Yet in Halifax, Canada, scenes of a drunken nature are not confined to its human denizens: the lampposts are at it too.

Tuesday, 22 April 2014

Britain's Got Talent, Paddy And Nico - Spectacular Salsa

Simon Cowell is not strictly in the mood for ballroom, but 80-year-old Paddy and Nico have much more in store than first appearances suggest. Watch what happens.



YouTube link

Today Is Earth Day


Earth Day is an annual event, celebrated on April 22. Events are held worldwide to demonstrate support for environmental protection. It was first celebrated in 1970, and is now coordinated globally by the Earth Day Network, and celebrated in more than 192 countries each year.

Google is celebrating Earth Day with an animated doodle of a Rufous humming bird, a puffer fish, a dung beetle, a jellyfish and a Veiled chameleon.

The 100 Terraced Garden Squares In Awaji Yumebutai, Japan

image credit: Ken Conley

The Awaji Yumebutai is a lively yet peaceful work of art made by man and nature. The area where it stands was a mountain before that was half-removed to use as seafill for the artificial islands where the Kansai International Airport is now located.

Designed by Tadao Ando, the whole structure shows how something destroyed can be brought back to life by blending in modern facilities with the green landscape. But what's special in this place is its 100-terraced garden squares or the 'Hyakudanen' that decorate the slope of the mountain.

Inside The Mundaneum

image credit: Marc Wathieu

Paul Otlet (1868-1944) was a Belgian author, visionary, lawyer and peace activist. He is one of several people who have been considered the father of information science, a field he 'called documentation.' In 1907, Otlet and Henri La Fontaine created a great international center called at first Palais Mondial (World Palace), later, the Mundaneum.

The Mundaneum aimed to gather together all the world's knowledge and classify it according to a system they developed called the Universal Decimal Classification. Here's a look inside the Mundaneum.

Havana Bikes

Cuba underwent a bicycle revolution in the 1990s during its five year 'Special Period.' Oil was scarce as a result of tough economic constraints, and bicycles where introduced as an alternative mode of transport.

Years later, the transportation crisis subsided and motorised vehicles returned, and the country's bicycle culture took a hit. Now, new bikes are difficult to come by and parts are not readily available, yet many Cubans still use bicycles daily and, despite the limited resources, a handful of mechanics provide a service to those who rely on their bikes in their everyday lives.



Vimeo link

(thanks Cora)

Daily Cartoon

Dan Rosandich is an American cartoonist. Dan's cartoons have appeared in the Saturday Evening Post, National Review, The National Enquirer, Science Digest, Reader's Digest and Woman's World. The Presurfer, in cooperation with Dan Rosandich, will bring you a cartoon every day.


Interpreting 'Physick': The Familiar And Foreign Eighteenth-Century Body

image credit

Our eighteenth-century forbears weren't stupid when it came to the art of healing. In the absence of key pieces of information - for examples, germ theory - they developed a model of the body, health, and healing that was fundamentally logical. Some treatments worked, and many didn’t, but there was a method to the apparent madness.